crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

(via zambiunicorn)

tmirai:

fuckingmonsters:

figuring out complicated designs in perspective doesnt have to make you mad so here is good tips to keep in mind. can be used for all kinds of things

Bloody brilliant. Thank you!

(via xannerz)

gamefreaksnz:

Six designs available for $12 this weekend only at Once Upon a Tee
Artwork by Rustenico, Alberto Arni, Jango Snow, Piercek25, and Wirdou

gamefreaksnz:

Six designs available for $12 this weekend only at Once Upon a Tee

Artwork by Rustenico, Alberto Arni, Jango Snow, Piercek25, and Wirdou

heysawbones:

abbysucks:

honestly, i dont know why i made this. 
i mean i do but

I empathize with your frustration over worn-out tropes. I really do. I also haven’t enjoyed the proliferation of Adventure Time clones. I think they’re boring (reason: they are boring).
I see where you might say, why is this any more original than what it purportedly stands against? You might question the motives of people designing these characters. Are these people really creating characters, or are these creations merely symbols of an immature political ideology? I get that. These characters aren’t somehow above criticism, either as tools for good storytelling, or vehicles of social responsibility.
That said, I can’t see why, out of all the things one could “call out” to shit on, this was it. Consider these possibilities, alone or combined:
Some white person made this character in order to actively deflect accusations of excluding others, and to gain credibility with their peers.
Some white person made this character because they like Pen Ward stuff, and felt this character was a good fit for their cast.
A white person made this character because they felt that it is important to convey that white is not synonymous with default.
A person who is not white made this character because they felt that it is important to convey that white is not synonymous with default.
 A person who is not white made this character because they like Pen Ward stuff, and felt this character was a good fit for their cast.
A person who is not white made this character because they feel like popular media pretends people like them, don’t exist.
A person who is not white made this character to piss off white people.
And then, just push it all right out your ear, because collectively, it doesn’t matter. It can be frustrating to see people doing the same thing over and over again, and patting themselves (and each other) on the back for it, but that’s if you look at it from way, way too close up. Zoom out a lot. This is a big picture thing.
No matter what the shallow, self-absorbed, social-climbing, industrious, brave, determined, callous, cynical, idealistic, immature, or visionary reasons the individual may have for creating a character that pointedly deviates from “white male as default”, the collective result is that people are progressively made aware that white males are not the default. The idea may not seem new to you, given that you have your microscope trained on a part of the internet that is rather specifically invested in this sort of thing. Myopia makes this seem more all-encompassing than it really is - out there in the rest of the Western world, media representation is still overwhelmingly white, and tailored to the sensibilities of men. Pull back a little bit, let the assumptions about people’s personal motivations slide (I have a hard time with this too, but let’s face it: a lot of good things have happened both despite and because of people with selfish motives), and it’s easier to see that ultimately, the “punk chunky brown girl” is a good thing.

heysawbones:

abbysucks:

honestly, i dont know why i made this. 

i mean i do but

I empathize with your frustration over worn-out tropes. I really do. I also haven’t enjoyed the proliferation of Adventure Time clones. I think they’re boring (reason: they are boring).

I see where you might say, why is this any more original than what it purportedly stands against? You might question the motives of people designing these characters. Are these people really creating characters, or are these creations merely symbols of an immature political ideology? I get that. These characters aren’t somehow above criticism, either as tools for good storytelling, or vehicles of social responsibility.

That said, I can’t see why, out of all the things one could “call out” to shit on, this was it. Consider these possibilities, alone or combined:

  1. Some white person made this character in order to actively deflect accusations of excluding others, and to gain credibility with their peers.
  2. Some white person made this character because they like Pen Ward stuff, and felt this character was a good fit for their cast.
  3. A white person made this character because they felt that it is important to convey that white is not synonymous with default.
  4. A person who is not white made this character because they felt that it is important to convey that white is not synonymous with default.
  5.  A person who is not white made this character because they like Pen Ward stuff, and felt this character was a good fit for their cast.
  6. A person who is not white made this character because they feel like popular media pretends people like them, don’t exist.
  7. A person who is not white made this character to piss off white people.

And then, just push it all right out your ear, because collectively, it doesn’t matter. It can be frustrating to see people doing the same thing over and over again, and patting themselves (and each other) on the back for it, but that’s if you look at it from way, way too close up. Zoom out a lot. This is a big picture thing.

No matter what the shallow, self-absorbed, social-climbing, industrious, brave, determined, callous, cynical, idealistic, immature, or visionary reasons the individual may have for creating a character that pointedly deviates from “white male as default”, the collective result is that people are progressively made aware that white males are not the default. The idea may not seem new to you, given that you have your microscope trained on a part of the internet that is rather specifically invested in this sort of thing. Myopia makes this seem more all-encompassing than it really is - out there in the rest of the Western world, media representation is still overwhelmingly white, and tailored to the sensibilities of men. Pull back a little bit, let the assumptions about people’s personal motivations slide (I have a hard time with this too, but let’s face it: a lot of good things have happened both despite and because of people with selfish motives), and it’s easier to see that ultimately, the “punk chunky brown girl” is a good thing.

This is what I want at my funeral.

This is what I want at my funeral.

(Source: rocknrollercoaster, via pelodance)

maariamph:

I saw a hot lady at a grocery store, kinda trying to remember what she looked like
Black people are a small minority in Finland and every time you see one chances are they’re really well dressed

Hell *I’d* wear that!

maariamph:

I saw a hot lady at a grocery store, kinda trying to remember what she looked like

Black people are a small minority in Finland and every time you see one chances are they’re really well dressed

Hell *I’d* wear that!

(via hyperbali)

I remember that! :)

I remember that! :)

(Source: louiecyphre, via stumpynat)

explore-blog:

Julia Cameron on how to get out of your own way and unblock the “spiritual electricity” of creative flow – a timelessly wonderful read from 1992